Peltier bottle

Peltier

Vermentino, 2014

Peltier Station was a little California train depot that, during Prohibition, satisfied local demand for homemade wines. Third-generation grape growers Rodney and Gayla Schatz decided to name their vineyard after the station to honor its role in keeping the local wine industry alive. But they felt a name was too small a gesture, so they also implemented a system of sustainable farming practices that improves the health and soil nutrition of the land.

Profile

Peltier Vermentino is a bit more flavorful than a typical Italian Vermentino because the grapes were grown in a warm climate. More ripeness on the vine means more flavor intensity in the glass.

Low
High
TANNIN
SWEETNESS
BODY
ACIDITY
APPEARANCE
Pale yellow with golden edges
APPEARANCE
Pale yellow with golden edges
FLAVORS & AROMAS
Wild herbs
Melon
Brioche
Guava

Pairing

Light, fresh whites elevate the flavors of a dish’s fresh ingredients and help them shine, almost like a chorus providing the background harmony. That’s why these wines—such as Pinot Grigio, Grüner Veltliner and unoaked Chardonnays—are sublime with simple broiled sardines.

TASTING TIP

Smell and taste for this wine’s subtle tropical-fruit flavor. It’s not typical of Vermentino; it’s a result of Lodi’s warm climate.

Pour a light, bright white that will cut the eggy richness, and also balance out the soy-miso flavor of the dish.

Pour a light, fresh white that won't get in the way of the fish, and will match the zestiness of the salsa verde.

This dish is all about the pesto, so pour a light, fresh wine that makes its flavor and aroma pop. Simple as that.

A light, fresh white is brighten up the verde sauce, and also help cut the dish's richness.

Pour a light, fresh white to balance this Asian-style dish's sweet-salty-spicy flavor combo.

Pour a light, bright white to match the citrusy salad and help dial back the tacos' spiciness.

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More About The Wine

Lodi is a warm, dry region where just about every grape variety, red or white, grows well. Winemaking immigrants from Europe figured this out around 1850. Italian settlers were especially successful with their native varieties, Vermentino being one of them.

DID YOU KNOW?

Vermentino, known as Rolle in France, is a popular Italian grape. It grows exceptionally well in California, but isn’t widely planted beyond the Mediterranean—yet.

  • VARIETY
    Vermentino
  • VINTAGE
    2014
  • VINEYARD
    Peltier Vineyard
  • APPELLATION REGION, STATE
    Lodi, California
  • OAK
    Stainless steel (no oak)
  • SOIL
    San Joaquin silt loam
  • ALCOHOL
    13.8%
  • FARMING
    Certified Sustainable

WARNING to California Consumers Group 22 Created with Sketch.

Tasting Notes from Members